Iron Butterfly


Iron Butterfly,  In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida

In-a-gadda-da-vida honey,
don’tcha know that I love you?
In-a-gadda-da-vida baby,
don’tcha know that I’ll always be true?

Oh won’tcha come with me,
and take my hand?
Oh won’tcha come with me,
and walk this land?

Please take my hand…

Let me tell ya now.
In-a-gadda-da-vida honey,
don’tcha know that I love you?
In-a-gadda-da-vida baby,
don’tcha know that I’ll always be true?

Oh won’tcha come with me,
and take my hand?
Oh won’tcha come with me,
and walk this land?

Please take my hand…

Let me tell ya.

Two,three,four!

In-a-gadda-da-vida honey,
don’tcha know that I love you?
In-a-gadda-da-vida baby,
don’tcha know that I’ll always be true?

This was written by Doug Ingle, Iron Butterfly’s vocalist and keyboard player. His father was a church organist.

The title was supposed to be “In The Garden Of Eden.” Someone had written “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida,” possibly while drunk, on a demo copy. A record company executive saw it and decided to use it as the title, since it sounded mystical and Eastern spirituality was big at the time, with The Beatles going to India and The Rolling Stones experimenting with Indian instruments.

There are so many different stories about the title.  “the liner notes on ‘the best of’ CD compilation state that drummer Ron Bushy was listening to the track through headphones, and couldn’t hear correctly; he simply distorted what Doug Ingle answered when Ron asked him for the title of the song (which was originally In-The-Garden-Of-Venus). An alternate version of the story, as stated in the liner notes of the 1995 re-release of the In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida album, states that Ingle was drunk when he first told Bushy the title, so Bushy wrote it down. Bushy then showed Ingle what he had written, and the slurred title stuck.”  From Wikipedia

This was the first hit song that could be classified as “Heavy Metal.” The phrase was introduced that year in the Steppenwolf song “Born To Be Wild.”

Actually Iron Butterfly was not “stuck at the airport” and didn’t make Woodstock. They were at a hotel waiting to be picked up to go to the venue,and were not told that they had been dropped from the lineup. The promoters had decided at the last moment that their heavy metal sound was not going to coincide with what they wanted, and simply didn’t send a car to pick them up.

The recording that is heard on the album was done as soundcheck filler for engineer Don Casale while the band waited for the arrival of producer Jim Hilton. However, after the rehearsal was completed it was agreed that the performance was of sufficient quality that another take wasn’t needed.

The song was used in The Simpsons episode “Bart Sells His Soul,” where Bart switches a hymn out for this song and convinces the Reverend Lovejoy it is penned by I. Ron Butterfly. The whole 17-minute version is played by the First Church of Springfield’s exhausted church organist.

The fact remains that “In A Gadda Da Vida” was way ahead of it’s time. It was a brilliant track then, and still is. Listening to it with today’s “ears” you can say what you will. But in 1968 when the song/album was released it was the heaviest sound many of us heard. And Doug Ingle’s baritone vocals the heaviest. Today I can say that the bass is repetitive, but that is irrelevant. Iron Butterfly with “In A Gadda Da Vida” broke new ground. And they wern’t just volume or amplifiers, they represented a break-through sound (and a great name for a band).
This song has a really good rhythm and beat. It’s used in the beginning of a Supernatural episode called “Skin”, and the way it accompanies the scene is pretty wicked. from Songfacts


Origin:    San Diego, California, United States
Genres:    Psychedelic rock, heavy metal[1] acid rock, blues rock, hard rock
Years active: 1966–1971, 1974–1985, 1987–present
Website: http://www.ironbutterfly.com
Members: Ron Bushy, Lee Dorman, Charlie Marinkovich, Martin Gerschwitz

Albums

Heavy (1968) US #78, Certified Gold
In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida (1968) US #4, Certified 4x Platinum
Soundtrack to The Savage 7 (1968; contributors with Cream)
Ball (1969) US #3, Certified Gold
Live (1970) US #20
Metamorphosis (1970) US#16
Evolution: The Best of Iron Butterfly (1971)
Star Collection (1973)
Scorching Beauty (1975) US #138
Sun and Steel (1976) US #207
Rare Flight (1988)
Light & Heavy: The Best of Iron Butterfly (1993)
In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida Deluxe Edition (1995)
Fillmore East 1968 (2011)

Iron Butterfly – Article

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3 Responses to “Iron Butterfly”

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