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Posted in Rush with tags , , , , , , , on October 9, 2011 by fliker1970

“Tom Sawyer”  from the album Moving Pictures
B-side,  “Witch Hunt” (USA), “A Passage to Bangkok” (UK)
Released,February 28, 1981
Format     7″
Recorded,October – November 1980 at Le Studio, Morin Heights, Quebec
Genre,Progressive rock, hard rock
Length,    4:33
Label,Mercury
Writers    Geddy Lee, Neil Peart, Alex Lifeson, Pye Dubois
Producer,Rush and Terry Brown

A modern-day warrior
Mean mean stride,
Today’s Tom Sawyer
Mean mean pride.

Though his mind is not for rent,
Don’t put him down as arrogant.
His reserve, a quiet defense,
Riding out the day’s events.
The river

And what you say about his company
Is what you say about society.
Catch the mist, catch the myth
Catch the mystery, catch the drift.

The world is, the world is,
Love and life are deep,
Maybe as his eyes are wide.
Today’s Tom Sawyer,
He gets high on you,
And the space he invades
He gets by on you.

No, his mind is not for rent
To any god or government.
Always hopeful, yet discontent,
He knows changes aren’t permanent,
But change is.

And what you say about his company
Is what you say about society.
Catch the witness, catch the wit,
Catch the spirit, catch the spit.

The world is, the world is,
Love and life are deep,
Maybe as his skies are wide.

Exit the warrior,
Today’s Tom Sawyer,
He gets high on you,
And the energy you trade,
He gets right on to the friction of the day.

Tom Sawyer

“Tom Sawyer” is a song by Canadian rock band Rush, named for Mark Twain’s literary character. The song was released on Mercury Records and PolyGram in 1981 on the Moving Pictures album and numerous compilations thereafter, such as 1990’s Chronicles. It has also appeared on several live albums and bootlegs. The song relies heavily on Geddy Lee’s synthesizer playing and the techniques of drummer Neil Peart. Geddy Lee has referred to the track as the band’s “defining piece of music…from the early ’80s”.

Frontman Geddy Lee said the band hated this classic track when they first recorded it. He explained: “I remember being disappointed in the studio, thinking we really didn’t capture the spirit of the song. We thought it was the worst song on the record at the time – but it all came together in the mix. Sometimes you don’t have the objectivity to know when you’re doing your best work.”(Songfacts)

In the December 1985 Rush Backstage Club newsletter, drummer and lyricist Neil Peart said: Tom Sawyer was a collaboration between myself and Pye Dubois, an excellent lyricist who wrote the lyrics for Max Webster. His original lyrics were kind of a portrait of a modern day rebel, a free-spirited individualist striding through the world wide-eyed and purposeful. I added the themes of reconciling the boy and man in myself, and the difference between what people are and what others perceive them to be – namely me I guess.

Geddy Lee told The Plain Dealer newspaper the band never foresaw the success of the song: He said: “The one song that we have to play for the rest of our lives. When we wrote it, we had no idea that it would touch such a nerve with people. In many ways, it’s the quintessential Rush song.”

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